Thursday, November 15, 2007

Denying the Sustainability Zeitgeist

It seems to me that we are on the verge of a sustainability zeitgeist - you'd almost have live under a rock to avoid hearing current issues on global warming, climate change, and so on. The evidence is surmounting and compelling; I think people are growing more aware of these environmental problems.

Of course, that doesn't mean everyone is going to do something about it.

I remember sometime ago, a friend commented on how she couldn't understand why a person would NOT do something pro-active to save the environment. Yah, sometimes it is difficult to adopt another perspective, but today I found a page that offers some insights into what "others" might be thinking about in regards to this issue.

I've selected a few examples for you to enjoy:

Rhett-Butlerist Features - “Peak Oil? Planetary Collapse? Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn.” Translation: Aggressive denial of information not in keeping with one’s world view.

Y2K features : “They said everything would collapse with 2000, and it didn’t.” Translation: A belief that any prior concern about societal problems that didn’t occur demonstrates the impossibility of any others happening in the future.

Submissive features: You're probably right. [Shrug]" Too hard/scary to think about... Translation: A response that acknowledges the reality of the threat, but is emotionally frozen or unwilling to devote emotional time and energy to the matter.

Magical Thinking : “Don’t worry, we can build a car that can run on air!” Translation: Proposes solutions that are clearly outside the realm of physics.

To read more of these enlightening comments, follow the link to the Energy Bulletin.

2 comments:

Beth in the Fake Plastic Fish Tank said...

I know. I'm always going back and forth between thinking that things are really changing fast and wondering if they are really changing at all. Within the same hour sometimes. It's such a strange time we're in.

Experimentaholic said...

Again, to me it goes back to an economic issue. If people had to pay 6 or 9 dollars for a gallon of gas, then you'd find fewer Hummers in Philadelphia. Which is disgusting. No one needs a hummer in Philadelphia.